Mother is the name for God in the lips and hearts of little children.
Mother is the name for God in the lips and hearts of little children.

Compassionate & Personalized Care for Women

Providers

  • Haritha Nadendla, MD, FACOG
  • Greg Brannon, MD, FACOG
  • Lisa Vendeland, DO, FACOG
Cary (Ph: 919-851-3480)

Mon - Thu : 8.30am – 5.00pm
Fri : 8.30am – 1.00pm

Morrisville  (Ph: 919-342-5383)

Mon : 8.30am – 5.00pm
Tue : 8.30am – 6.00pm
Thu : 8.30am – 5.00pm
Fri   : 8.30am – 6.00pm

Fuquay-Varina (Ph: 919-342-6674)

Mon : 2.00am – 5.00pm
Tue : 8.30am – 2.00pm

More Schedules to come at this Location

Sat & Sun Closed

After hours are available for working women

Managing stress during pregnancy

Is it common to be anxious a lot during pregnancy?

Pregnancy brings out the worrywart in all of us. And for good reason: You're growing a life inside of you.

Get a daily dose of helpful information about your pregnancy.

It's natural to fret about what you eat, drink, think, feel, and do. It's also perfectly normal to worry about whether your baby is healthy, how this new person will change your life and relationships, and whether you're truly up to the task of parenthood. But if your anxiety is becoming all-consuming and regularly interferes with your day-to-day functioning, it's time to find a better way to deal with it.

 

To start, gently share your fears with your partner — even if they're about him. Chances are he's harboring concerns of his own. Communicating openly about your anxiety can help you both feel better. Turn to friends or family members for support, too. Other moms-to-be are another source of support, as they're probably experiencing the same worries you are.

 

If you're extremely anxious or have a specific reason to be concerned about your baby's health, share your concerns with your caregiver. If anxiety still plagues you after you've aired your worries and checked in on your baby's well-being, professional counseling can help you get to the bottom of your troubles.

I have a lot of stress in my life right now. Will it affect my baby?

While everyday pressure is a part of modern life, a high level of chronic stress can boost your odds of preterm labor or of delivering a low-birthweight baby. If you're used to caring for others or giving 110 percent at work, making yourself a priority may seem unnatural or even selfish. But taking care of yourself is an essential part of taking care of your baby. Cutting down on stress — or learning how to manage it — makes for a healthier pregnancy.

How can I calm down?

Here are a few ways to manage your stress and reduce anxiety at work and at home:

Practice saying "no." Now's as good a time as any to get rid of the notion that you can do it all. You can't, so learn to let your superwoman ideals go. Make slowing down a priority, and get used to the idea of asking your friends and loved ones for help.

Cut back on chores — and use that time to put your feet up, nap, or read a book.

Take advantage of sick days or vacation whenever possible. Spending a day — or even an afternoon — resting at home will help you get through a tough week.

Try deep-breathing exercises, yoga, or stretching.

Get regular exercise such as swimming or walking.

Do your best to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet so you have the physical and emotional energy you need.

Go to bed early. Your body is working overtime to nourish your growing baby and needs all the sleep it can get.

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